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Beirut Explosion

Emergency Response

Lebanon Relief

A deadly blast ripped across Beirut on Aug. 4.


The explosion killed more than 150 people, injured thousands, and left dozens missing.


Direct Relief worked with longtime partners in the affected area to channel needed resources and assist with recovery efforts.

Direct Relief’s Response

The explosion that ripped through Beirut on August 4 killed at least 200 people. Injured 6,000. Caused suffering on an untold scale.

It also killed doctors, nurses, and patients in their hospitals. Destroyed vital medicines, vaccines, and personal protective equipment. Damaged primary health care centers. And placed tremendous strain on a health system already in crisis.

On June 18th, 2021 AUBMC - American University of Beirut Medical Center in Lebanon received of a shipment of Direct Relief-purchased medical equipment and supplies delivered by Anera. The delivery included two oxygen supply systems to support the recovery of Covid-19 patients. (Photos courtesy of Anera)
On June 18th, 2021, AUBMC – American University of Beirut Medical Center in Lebanon received a shipment of Direct Relief-purchased medical equipment and supplies delivered by Anera. The delivery included two oxygen supply systems to support the recovery of Covid-19 patients. (Photos courtesy of Anera)

Lebanon was experiencing a chronic lack of medicines and medical supplies before the explosion, and the Covid-19 pandemic stretched healthcare resources.

The blast compounded the severe strain on the nation’s healthcare system.

Six major hospitals and 20 clinics suffered damage and, according to UNOCHA, the blast rendered half of all medical facilities within 9.3 miles either inoperable or partially operable.

More than 170 pallets of medical aid were staged in Direct Relief's warehouse on August 17, 2020, for medical facilities in Beirut, Lebanon. The infusion of medical aid was the first in a series and contained personal protective equipment and requested essential medicines for health facilities responding after an explosion ripped through the city, resulting in casualties and significant strain on the medical system.
More than 170 pallets of medical aid were staged in Direct Relief’s warehouse on August 17, 2020, for medical facilities in Beirut, Lebanon. The infusion of medical assistance was the first in a series and contained personal protective equipment and requested essential medicines for health facilities responding after an explosion ripped through the city, resulting in casualties and significant strain on the medical system.

Direct Relief extended a $50,000 grant to its long-time regional partner Anera and has made $500,000 available to response efforts.

With support from FedEx, Direct Relief also delivered more than 60 tons of critical aid from Direct Relief to support the efforts of medical personnel in Beirut, Lebanon.