Global Update: Haiti Response Continues, The Lancet Interviews Direct Relief

Recent news, including the organization's award of a “Perfect 100” charity score and renewed four-star rating from Charity Navigator.

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Health

A community health worker with Health Equity International administers a Covid-19 vaccine to a patient in Haiti. Health Equity International operates St. Boniface Hospital in Haiti, which received medical aid from Direct Relief over the past week. (HEI photo)
A community health worker with Health Equity International administers a Covid-19 vaccine to a patient in Haiti. Health Equity International operates St. Boniface Hospital in Haiti, which received medical aid from Direct Relief over the past week. (HEI photo)

In Summary

  • Direct Relief retains its “Perfect 100” charity score and a renewed four-star rating from Charity Navigator, the country’s largest charity evaluator.
  • The Lancet interviews Direct Relief’s CEO and staff about how cold-chain issues can interfere with diabetes care around the world.
  • Three months after Haiti’s devastating earthquake, the organization has provided more than $18 million in medical aid and committed another $20.6 million.

Top Stories

Direct Relief Scores a “Perfect 100”

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The situation: Charity Navigator, the country’s foremost independent charity evaluator, rates a total of 160,000 nonprofits for transparency, use of finances, culture, leadership, and more.

The response:  Reflecting its strong financial health and commitment to accountability, Direct Relief earned a “Perfect 100” charity score and a renewed four-star rating, the evaluator’s highest ranking.

The impact: “Direct Relief receives no government funding and is deeply committed to honoring the generosity and intent of every person, organization, and business that pitches in and is part of the work,” said Thomas Tighe, Direct Relief CEO. “It’s gratifying to share the Charity Navigator recognition with each of them.”

In The Lancet, Direct Relief Weighs in on the Cold Chain and Diabetes

Association des Diabétiques du Congo hosts an annual summer camp in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo, for young people living with diabetes. The camp teaches youth how to manage diabetes with medication, nutrition, exercise and self-care. (Photo courtesy of Association des Diabétiques du Congo)

The situation: The vast majority of the world’s diabetes patients live in low- and middle-income countries, but insulin needs to be stored at cold temperatures, making it hard for people to get the treatment they need, The Lancet reports.

The response: The publication interviewed members of Direct Relief, including CEO Thomas Tighe, about how the organization is working to increase cold-chain infrastructure in low-resource settings.

The impact: As the cold chain becomes a larger part of pharmaceutical production and distribution, Direct Relief’s partners will be more prepared to transport and store medications – and treat patients.

Three Months After the Haiti Earthquake, Response Is Ongoing

Direct Relief’s emergency response team in Puerto Rico prepares supplies for shipment to Haiti in the wake of the August 14 earthquake. (Photo by Jose Jimenez Tirado for Direct Relief)

The situation: Three months after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake struck the south of Haiti, needs are shifting. Where before there were acute care needs such as crush syndrome, the problem is now medication and supply shortages.

The response: Direct Relief’s response to the earthquake has changed with Haiti’s needs. Most recently, the organization sent insulin, midwife kits, and Covid-19 therapies and rapid tests to the country. All told, Direct Relief has provided more than $18 million in medical aid, and has committed another $20.6 million. In addition $795,000 has been granted.

The impact: Recipients have included a hospital in the quake zone, doctors working in displacement camps, maternal and child health care providers, and more.

In Brief

The United States

Around the World

  • In the past two weeks, Direct Relief has made 33 shipments to 27 partners in 16 countries, totaling $22.2 million in value and more than 88,686 pounds.
  • Uneven Covid-19 vaccination rates are leading to surges in some countries.
  • In October, Direct Relief became a member of Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health (PMNCH) hosted by the World Health Organization.
  • Direct Relief provided a Covid-19 operations grant to a hospital in Egypt doing essential rare disease treatments.
  • A Bangladeshi hospital received enough midwife kits to facilitate more than 2,000 births, and enough fistula repair modules to conduct 150 surgeries to correct the devastating condition.

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