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Winter Storms, Tornadoes Pummel the Southern United States

Tornadoes have left concentrated paths of destruction and killed four in several Southern counties.

Storm-caused damage in Louisiana (Photo: Vernon Parish Sheriff Deputy Ricky Stephens)
Storm-caused damage in Louisiana (Photo: Vernon Parish Sheriff Deputy Ricky Stephens)

More than two dozen tornadoes have bombarded portions of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama since Monday, killing at least four and injuring more than a dozen.

The tornadoes appeared along with a line of severe storms that swept through the southern United States, affecting at least 25 counties. Several of the tornadoes have proven particularly destructive, leaving dozens of heavily damaged houses and other buildings in their wake. A school and daycare center in Louisiana was evacuated mere minutes before a tornado destroyed it.

The governors of Mississippi and Alabama have declared a state of emergency in the affected area.

The current spate of extreme weather is most likely not over yet, and the storm system itself seems to be moving east over time. Yesterday, the National Weather Service issued 85 tornado warnings and 85 warnings for severe thunderstorms. Less likely, but still of concern, were tornado watches in the Florida Panhandle and southeast Georgia.

A warning indicates that an extreme weather event has been sighted or indicated by weather tracking. A warning suggests that current circumstances make an extreme weather event possible.

Direct Relief has reached out to more than two dozen partners near the affected communities in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, to offer support. As always, the organization is committed to providing both emergency medical aid and longer-term assistance, should it be needed.

The organization’s emergency response team is continuing to monitor the situation and will communicate with local organizations to offer additional support if needed.

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